Life Lab

Life Lab cultivates children's love of learning, healthy food, and nature through garden-based education.

The California School Garden Training Program (CSGT) trained over 1,700 educators from 2012 – June, 2014. It included workshops on Creating and Sustaining Your School Garden (CSYSG) and Garden-Enhanced Nutrition Education (GENE). CSGT conducted Train-the-Trainer Workshops, where new leaders were trained to replicate the CSYSG and GENE workshops.

View these extensive resources for school garden educators and trainers

Creating and Sustaining Your School Garden Workshop Handouts and Trainer Guides

Download a zipped file (3.6MB) of all CSYSG Workshop Handouts, Trainer Outlines (TO), and Supplementary Trainer Materials.
These files are organized in folders with titles that match each section of the workshop. Each section folder contains participant handouts, a trainer outline, and a section separator page. The Supplementary Materials Folder contains a sample workshop flier, cover sheets, workshop evaluation, packet table of contents, supply lists, and more. Also find a folder with tips for working with adult learners. Happy trainings!

Why School Gardens Presentation

School Garden Design Elements Presentation

Garden-Enhanced Nutrition Education Workshop Handouts and Trainer Guides

Download all GENE Workshop Handouts and Trainer Materials  (zipped file 16.1MB) 

These files are organized in folders with titles that match each section of the workshop.The GENE Training Materials folder contains sample agendas, workshop evaluation, packet table of contents, packet cover sheet, supply lists, tips for working with adult learners, and Mini-Grant information. Happy trainings!

Download Edible Themed Crop Planning Image Cards and Lesson Instructions  (zipped file 11MB)

Garden-Enhanced Nutrition Education Workshop Introduction Presentation

GENE in Action Presentation

 

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California School Garden Training Program Final Numbers

Additionally the CSGT training model and resources were shared at 6 statewide conferences reaching 229 people.

Workshop Participant Final Survey Highlights

GENE

77% of final survey respondents stated that they increased the amount of fruits and vegetables they tasted/ate with students

67% said they increased time spent using the garden to teach nutrition education

97% noted some (56%) or significant (41%) marked improvement in their effectiveness in implementing garden-enhanced nutrition education

75% noted some (59%) or significant (16%) marked improvement in student’s families’ consumption of fruits and vegetables

CSYSG

27% installed a school garden

76% improved an existing school garden

73% shared what they learned from the Creating and Sustaining Your School Garden workshop with colleagues

93% noted some (45%) or significant (48%) marked improvement in their abilities to access resources to support their garden program

Quotes from Final Survey

“I never ate a snow pea pod before, now I will eat millions!” – Student

“Can we have some MORE kale chips?” – Student

“[My favorite thing I learned about in the garden was] drinking strawberry water. It tastes good and it’s good for you.” 4th grader, after making strawberry lemonade on a hot day and talking about the vitamins in strawberries.” – Student

“After my kindergarten students experienced “eating a rainbow” and the rainbow body… while eating their mid-morning snack at the snack table, they would hold up vegetables and fruits and bring them to the part of the body that the vegetable or fruit made healthy and say things like “my carrot is eye food” or “my grapes are brain food” – Teacher

“One of my high school students is on the football team. One day when we were working on our school garden I saw him staring at the football field. When I asked him what he was doing, he said, “I was just thinking about how much food we could grow if we converted this football field.” – Teacher

“I am a community partner working in an elementary school that has a majority of youth in the free and reduced lunch program. They often get vegetables they do not like in the packaged meals and have a bad association with eating their vegetables. We grew fresh carrots in the garden and the kids came out of the garden so happy to be carrying their harvest! In fact, it has made them more adventurous to try new items that the school district is implementing. Some kids I never expected to be trying new items are eating and enjoying raw sweet potatoes! Just like me, when you invest time into something and care for it, you are that much more likely to try it and be empowered to grow more!” – Student

“I didn’t know worms and bugs were so much fun to play with! I didn’t know I liked Kale! Now I know I like 3 different kinds of kale!” – Student

 

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5 months ago

Life Lab

www.lifelab.org/jobs Full-time Bilingual Garden Educators at PVUSD School Gardens and Summer Program Staff at Garden Classroom on UCSC Farm

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5 months ago

Life Lab

Full-time Career and Summer Staff Positions in @pajarovalleyusd school gardens and the Life Lab Garden Classroom. On the @ucscagroecology farm @ucsc @pvusdschoolfood lifeLab.org/jobs

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5 months ago

Life Lab

We are so glad to be a part of this year’s Growing School Gardens Summit! 415 attendees from 45 states across the US, representing 6,000+ school gardens serving more than 2.5 million students. Here we go!!

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7 months ago

Life Lab

Rainbow Chips 📗🌱📙🍊📕🍅In this lesson students introduce themselves, create group agreements, listen to a story about a rainbow, and then go on a search for different colors in order to begin to form a personal connection with the #gardenclassroom .Also, we just wanted to show this really awesome squash gradience 😄#gardenbasededucation #NGSS #scienceinthegarden #schoolgarden #NGSGintheGarden

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7 months ago

Life Lab

Food Factories 🍅🥗😋In this lesson, students find leaves with holes in them and then construct explanations for what might havecaused those holes. They listen to a story book and add further possible explanations for the holes. Thenthey explore the garden to prepare to engage in argument from evidence about which explanation for these holes seems the most plausible. Finally, they relate this concept to plants that humans eat.#NGSGintheGarden #NGSS #gardenbasededucation

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7 months ago

Life Lab

Today we set our seedlings out to the sun! After planting a seed, students have been caring for their pet plants for four weeks now! Recording their growth and how they change over time. We fed them compost and watered them in their new home in the garden!#NGSS #seed #gardenbasededucation #NGSGintheGarden

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7 months ago

Life Lab

Happy SUNday everyone!

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Life Lab 40th
Life Lab’s 40th Gala – Sunday, October 13th  Celebrate 40 years of bringing learning to life in gardens. Learn more  
Life Lab's 40th Gala
Life Lab provides truly inspiring training. Their breadth of experience, joy for teaching, and commitment to sharing knowledge highlight the best practices in food and garden education.
Erica CurryTraining and Professional Development ManagerFoodCorps
Thank you for such a wonderful field trip experience! Your leaders did such a great job at keeping our kids engaged.
Sheila BrickenKindergarten TeacherSan Lorenzo Valley Elementary
Terry had another awesome two weeks at Life Lab. I think he learns more there than in any other part of his year. School is great, but he’s passionate (and often dogmatic) about what he learns there.
Tara NeierCamp ParentSummer camp mom
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